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What is a Kanban Roadmap?
4 mins read

Kanban Roadmap

What is a Kanban Roadmap?

The Origins Of Kanban

Kanban is a methodology that was created by Toyota in the middle of the 20th Century. The idea was to create a system that harmonized the ordering of materials from suppliers in manufacturing with the scheduled production process so that efficiency would be maximized, waste minimized, and overall cost reduced.

This is considered to be a type of ‘Just-In-Time’ (JIT) manufacturing. A card system was used in the manufacturing plant so that when the installment of a specific part occurred, the corresponding physical card was processed in parallel. In this manner, the supply chain became more streamlined and robust, and oversight became more comprehensive.

The system was an intuitive representation for the workers and made them able to visually understand the manufacturing process. It also created improved communication between different sections of the entire production line.

Since Kanban was designed to be a project management system, it was natural to translate the concept into other areas such as agile software development.

Although Kanban itself is not specifically designed for strategic planning per se, it had inherent flexibility enabling its adaption and adoption elsewhere.

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An Example of a Kanban Product Roadmap

A Kanban Roadmap is adaptable in that it can be applied across all manner of products or services that are in the midst of their manufacture.

Lists can represent the stage of a task. In a schematic format, these would be digital columns (on the vertical) and the task would be a digital card.

As a task moves through production, it can be placed in a list and then advanced to another (which intuitively works from left to right). For example, developing cloud support for a software application will start in an “outstanding” list but be moved into an “underway” one once work has begun. Naturally, moving it to a “complete” listing on its finalizing may then occur.

A Product Manager may want an assessment period for quality assurance purposes. This may give rise to another list entitled “under review’. Should that task (the work) pass final muster, its card could then be advanced to a list called ‘waiting’ and then finally to ‘delivered’ once the definitive version has been incorporated into the wider product. Equally, when a card reaches the ‘under review’ list, and the work is not up to standard, it could be bumped back to ‘underway’ for further development, and by this method will pass through the developmental process again.

In contrast to the above, A Kanban Roadmap can depict the different departments of an organization by showing them horizontally.

When considering the progress of a task in the vertical, and then also the department in the horizontal, a visual representation can be created to illustrate at what point of the wider process a particular task (and its corresponding card) is at, and with which group of people it currently sits.

In the case of developing cloud support for the software application, the work might pass from a programming team in the first development wave to a marketing team once the ‘building’ has been completed. In this way, the Kanban concept is dynamic.

Commonly, to aid visual understanding, techniques such as color-coding can be incorporated.

What Are the Advantages of Using Kanban Product Roadmapping?

All the projects that are ongoing around the development of a product can be recorded, monitored, and easily communicated. But, beyond this, any intangible or aspirational elements of the development of a product can also be captured.

In essence, the Kanban concept caters to both highly strategic planning but also factory-floor, tactical day-to-day, output, and promotes a clear distinction between them.

A Kanban Roadmap can be used to broadcast different aspects of the development of a product to different stakeholders. It is evident that a group of investors will require broadly different information in a product status appraisal compared to a developmental update being disclosed to the development team.

The status of the product remains the same in both instances but the Kanban method enables the appropriate and relevant information to be disseminated to both groups concisely.

The Best Time to Use Kanban Roadmapping

Kanban Roadmapping is best deployed when an organization is subject to a constantly evolving and fast-moving marketplace.

Especially in regard to agile product development, the Kanban concept is responsive to a business model that must continually absorb and utilize new market data, and thus regularly reassess their development priorities.

The Kanban concept ultimately enables a Product Manager - and their constituent stakeholders - to continuously examine and reexamine their decision-making thereupon making it possible to shift developmental direction when the need arises.

In this regard, the commitment to previously established deadlines or specific initiatives can be reviewed so that the whole development process can remain dynamic.

General FAQ

How can product managers benefit from a Kanban Roadmap?
Product managers can use Kanban roadmaps to structure product development plans around tasks and gain at-a-glance visual insights into progress. They don’t need to study in-depth reports or reach out to staff: all the updates they need are easily accessible. They can see which tasks need to be completed first, and prioritize work based on goals’ importance.
When should you use a Kanban Roadmap?
Product managers may benefit from using a Kanban roadmap on new or existing projects. For example, if development of a product has stalled or is becoming confusing to manage, a Kanban roadmap can help to make accomplishing key goals simpler. They have the power to streamline processes and simplify the steps required to complete products.
What are some other types of roadmaps?
Other types of roadmaps include market & strategy (which help teams determine which markets they’re targeting), visionary (which focus on trends and how businesses can take advantage of them), and technology (which show how a company’s products align with industry/cultural trends).
What are the differences between a timeline roadmap and a Kanban roadmap?
A timeline roadmap is based on deadlines and accomplishing tasks within certain timeframes. They offer no contextual information for goals. Kanban roadmaps organize different cards into columns across specific boards, with clear names and details relating to each task. They can be rearranged easily.
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